5 Tips On How To Tell Your Spouse You Want A Divorce And Not Hate Each Other

Sad looking siblings with arguing parents behind them

When Janet told her husband Matt that she wanted a divorce, he ignored her. A few weeks later, a process server showed up at the door and handed him papers marked “divorce summons.” That’s when Matt realized she was serious. Despite Janet’s efforts to let Matt know her feelings, he still expressed shock and resentment. This set the stage for a very bitter contested divorce.

Most people are uncomfortable with conflict. But you cannot afford to “ghost” out of a marriage when you have kids and property to divide. If you haven’t told your spouse you are unhappy, the news of a divorce will be even more devastating to them. So how can you avoid surprising your spouse and set the stage for a “friendly” divorce (if at all possible)? Here are a few tips to approach the divorce conversation with that goal in mind: Continue reading “5 Tips On How To Tell Your Spouse You Want A Divorce And Not Hate Each Other”

FAQ: How To Divorce When Spouse Is Gone

FAQ: What happens if you can’t locate your spouse but you want a divorce? Listen for my 1-minute answer. Got more questions? Message me.

I’m not going anywhere…

Custody Tip For a Friendly Divorce After Quarantine

Believe it or not, many people live together during the divorce process. Here’s one tip you can use to make things a bit easier if you are focused on an amicable divorce.

NYC Virtual Courts Opening on April 13, 2020 for Non-Emergent Matters

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Ready to get back to Court… virtually.

The New York State court system officially announced today that beginning on Monday, April 13, 2020, virtual courts will handle more than essential and emergency matters. This is great news for advancing cases along.

In a memo issued today the Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence K. Marks said that judges should review their caseloads to see which court conferences can be helpful in advancing a case, including achieving a resolution.

Judges can also schedule conferences at the request of attorneys, and can be available during normal court hours to address discovery disputes and other ad hoc concerns.
And judges may decide fully submitted motions.

All conferences must be done by Skype or telephone.